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Single Dragadiddle

Drum Rudiment Master Class & Rudiment Guide

The single dragadiddle is one of the three drum rudiments from the drag family that incorporates the single paradiddle into its sticking pattern. In this free drum lesson, Lionel Duperron teaches you how to play the single dragadiddle and how to incorporate it into drum beats and drum fills.

The single dragadiddle is very similar to the single paradiddle and the flam paradiddle. Their main difference resides on the first note. The single dragadiddle starts with a 32nd note bounced double stroke instead of with a flam like the flam paradiddle, or with a single stroke like the single paradiddle. The double stroke is represented with a diagonal line on the note stems from the sheet music below. You can count the single dragadiddle as 16th notes or as you would the flam paradiddle and the single paradiddle – RR(drag or par) L(a) R(did) R(dle) LL(drag or par) R(a) L(did) L(dle)…etc.

It’s essential for you to learn how to play the single paradiddle and the double stroke roll before the single dragadiddle. Doing so will actually speed up your learning process.

Drum Beats

Exercise #1 is a 32nd note drum beat. The single dragadiddle is scattered between the hi-hat and the snare drum. The left hand plays ghost notes on the snare drum and the 32nd note bounced double strokes on counts 2 and 4. The right hand plays the hi-hat throughout the whole pattern. Once you have the hands happening, add the bass drum on counts 1 and 3.

Exercise #2 is a variation on the previous 32nd note drum beat. The single dragadiddle is scattered between the ride cymbal, the hi-hat, the hi-tom, and the snare drum. Thus, memorizing and playing this drum beat is a challenge. The 32nd note double strokes on the hi-tom and the 16th note double strokes on the bow of the ride cymbal are played with the right hand. The left hand plays the 32nd note double strokes on the snare drum and the 16th note double strokes on the hi-hat. Once you have mastered the hand pattern, add the bass drum on counts 1 and 3.

Drum Fills

Exercise #3 is a 32nd note drum fill. Playing even sounding 16th note double strokes is the main challenge you’ll face with this drum fill, since they’re played on the mid- and floor tom. To work around this issue, play each stroke of the doubles with the wrists. Playing the second stroke with a quick snap of the fingers, after playing the initial stroke of the double with the wrist is a good option as well. These two methods will get you playing very consistent sounding doubles on any soggy surface.

Exercise #4 is a 32nd note drum fill where the 16th note single and double strokes are played on the snare drum. The 32nd note doubles are performed on the hi-hat on counts 1 and 3, and on the bow of the ride cymbal on counts 2 and 4. The bass drum is played in unison with the first stroke from the 32nd note double strokes.

Once you’re done with this free drum lesson, move on to learn how to play the dragadiddle #1. The dragadiddle #1 is the second pattern from the drag family of drum rudiments to feature the single paradiddle.


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