Drum Set Mic Technique Overview

Easy Drumming That Sounds Hard

In this free drum lesson, DrumLessons.com sound engineer Victor Guidera teaches you the meaning of some of the most common technical terms and theory behind drum set miking for both live and studio settings. With this video you’ll learn what are audio spectrums and frequency responses, and how the type of microphone you use to record a given instrument affects the overall sound you’re capturing.

Although you can rely on sound engineers to get the best sound out of your drum set in any live or studio setting, you must be well aware that their work is only a small portion of what’s required to make your drum set sound amazing. The type of microphones used and the recording and mixing techniques are all very important, but not as much as what you’re responsible for.

It all starts with the instruments you buy. Great drums and cymbals are the number one reason for getting your drum set to sound great in any record you’re a part of. Your tuning skills and the skins you buy are a close second. You can have the most exquisite and expensive drum set in the world. If you don’t know how to tune it properly or if you buy really crappy drumheads, you’ll have the sound of a 100$ drum set.

You must learn how to tune your drum set properly and resist the urge of cheaping out on drumheads. This means you have to practice tuning and experiment with a lot of different quality drumhead options. If you want to improve on your tuning skills, check the free drum lessons on tuning we have here for you on DrumLessons.com. We encourage you to check the free drum lesson “How To Tune Your Snare Drum” to get started right away. How you hit the drums and cymbals is the last thing you’re responsible for. Hitting them properly requires good technique and spending time on your practice room.

This free drum lesson is an indispensable companion to the free drum lessons on miking a drum set. If you haven’t checked those free drum lessons yet, start by watching the one that teaches you “How To Mic A Bass Drum“.

If you’ve already watched all the free drum lessons on tuning and miking, you can move on to the free drum lessons on EQuing a drum set. You can pick and choose between the various free drum lessons on this topic, or start by watching the one that teaches you “How To EQ A Bass Drum“, if you don’t know where to get started.


This Lesson Has 12 Comments

  • Mac says:

    Would a logitech mic work for recording? I heard it was good for overall sound.

  • Lucas says:

    Hey, would the Alesis MultiMix 16 USB FX – 16-Channel USB Mixer be a wise investment for a recording device?

  • Zach S says:

    I have a quick question. I really want to purchase some mics for my kit but I dont know what to get. I dont have a whole lot of money, so I want to go the cheapest possible route without loosing to much sound quality in the process. Also what other things do I need besides the mics to start recording? MUCH APPRECIATED! thanks!

  • Rusty Somogyi says:

    Good stuff Victor. I’m running inexpensive CAD mics through a ZOOM R 16. I’m very pleased with everything but trying to improve the “live” sound with the EQ. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance!

    • Victor Guidera says:

      What exactly do you mean by “Live” sound? Maybe the Overhead mics? You may want to change the mic placement before digging into EQing them.

  • juan says:

    hy can you talk about the may system?
    i want know some tips about it,please.
    Thanks

  • Hot Shit says:

    Holy cow you look good in that shirt! I like the way you are so calm and knowledgable :)

  • code1 says:

    Great! Cant wait for the EQing video. Thats what Im mostly interested in.

  • Ron Roll says:

    I’ve got my drums set up with CAD mics going through a Line 6 UX8
    what would you suggest for settings for this type of set up?
    or what do you think of this set up?
    Thanks
    Ron

    PS ..Great info on all you show here and the other vids

    • Victor Guidera says:

      That setup sounds like it would work just fine. I think any 8-channel Audio Interface would be a good investment for drummers.

  • Nathan says:

    Thx! helped so much!

 
 

Leave a Comment

     

Notify me followup comments via e-mail.